Articles and Papers

Defining and Distinguishing Homeland from National Security and Climate-Related Environmental Security, in Theory and Practice
(full text)

ABSTRACT: The worsening effects of human-caused climate change, as well as issues most Americans view as “homeland security” (HS) can be seen in the news almost every day. Yet most in the general public and even many in security-related fields do not connect the two arenas, even though climate change, and interrelated resource competition and conflicts that together make up the growing field of environmental security (ES), are increasingly important risk and response variables for homeland security and emergency management. Current climate change effects are already destructive and volatile, but the future projected impacts are likely to be severe and costly to the economic, political, and social health of many nations as well as to a large proportion of the world’s population. The focus of this paper is to describe and connect the evolving concepts of environmental security, homeland security, and national security (NS). Definitions and missions for each concept are discussed, consistent with current, even if contested, practice and theory. Better comparative analysis of these unique but intimately connected realms will help advance the development of more comprehensive and sustainable security policy and strategy. (Terrence M. O’Sullivan and James D. Ramsay)

 

Research and Policy in Homeland Security and Climate Change: Results from a Roundtable and Thoughts on Developing a National Research Agenda for Climate Change and Security  
(full text)

ABSTRACT: To scientists, there is a clear consensus that human activities have a measurable effect on the climate, and that subsequently there are concerns about how a changing climate could impact global economies, trade relations, water (and other resource) access and logically therefore, also to security. Whether anthropomorphic climate change is a homeland or national security issue is a difficult distinction to make given the lack of consensus over the definition of modern homeland security. However, such distinctions may be moot given the recent and profound changes in the Arctic. On the one hand, Alaska shares a coastline with the Arctic Ocean; hence security concerns in the Arctic may be considered homeland security issues. On the other hand, given the Russian military interest/presence in the Arctic, security concerns in the Arctic may be considered matters of national security. The resulting challenge to the academic community is how to move the discussion about climate change and security forward. The authors recently held a roundtable at Penn State University that included several distinguished and accomplished policy makers, executives and scholars who collectively examined the impacts and threats posed by climate change. (James D. Ramsay and Kent Butts)

 

There’s a Pattern Here: The Case to Integrate Environmental Security into Homeland Security Strategy 
(full text)

ABSTRACT: The time is long overdue to acknowledge that global climate and resource stresses, encompassed by the concept of environmental security (ES), are an increasingly important part of “homeland” security (HS) study and practice, by even the most restricted definitions of HS. Environmental security issues will affect global economic and political stability, US national interests, and the risk of war and terrorism. Just as homeland security encompasses many complex issues and interconnected sub-fields, environmental security (ES) is interdisciplinary by nature.  In essence, ES is an emergent discipline borrowing from a combination of environmental studies – which decades ago integrated environmental science with public policy – and the broader observations of how environmental change, extreme weather events and resource scarcity issues impact domestic and international security.  In a two-part argument, we first observe the growing environmental and resource related security threats at every level of analysis, from global to individual levels as consequences of warming-induced climate alterations.  Next, given the significant impacts on local, regional, and international geopolitical stability, we discuss why environmental security threats must be incorporated into both homeland and national security strategic planning.  Developing a theory of environmental security seems central to a more complete understanding of homeland security and a more modern concept of national security. (James D. Ramsay and Terrence M. O’Sullivan)

 

Perceptual Framing of Homeland Security 
(full text)

ABSTRACT:  This article analyzes the phenomenon of homeland security through the development of four conceptual lenses that were created out of the existing literatures in criminal justice, public administration, organization behavior, risk management, international relations, and the overlap between them. Using terrorism as a proxy for the homeland security enterprise, these conceptual lenses include: (1) homeland security as a criminal justice problem which views terrorism as a crime; (2) homeland security as a international relations problem which views terrorism as a war; (3) homeland security as an organization design problem which views terrorism as a network of sub-state  transnational actors; and (4) homeland security as a collaborative nexus which views terrorism as a complex mixture of social, political, economic, and environmental issues; that is, lens 4 represents an overlap of lenses 1-3. Each conceptual lens consists of theories, practices, values, beliefs, and assumptions that serve to shape how homeland security is conceptualized. We recognize that homeland security is a broad field applied science that incorporates natural, technological, and manmade hazards and threats. Perhaps to best exemplify the complex and evolving nature of the homeland security enterprise, terrorism can be an effective proxy for how homeland security might be conceptualized and how a theoretical foundation might be structured. These conceptual lenses highlight how perceptual filters can significantly alter how individuals and organizations understand and explain phenomena or events. (Linda Kiltz and James D. Ramsay)

Various medicines available from the Web to why to waste season and visit drugstore if you can readily get medicines sit at home. For instance Diprolene cream is a topical corticosteroid. This remedy reduce swelling associated with various skin problems. Kamagra which is used to treat erectile malfunction and other states connected to erectile disfunction. Kamagra is a drug prescribed to treat numerous upsets. What do you have to know about kamagra shop? Where you can read correct data about buy super kamagra? Other point we have to is buy kamagra online. Many peradventure sure the effectiveness of Kamagra is well documented. After all, there are some of explanations and physicians are commonly able to pinpoint your problem through biological tests. Are you going to purchase medicines, such as Kamagra, online? Store the drugs away from excess moisture. For instance the liquid medicines preferably have to be kept in the refrigerator, but also may be stored at room temperature.

Member Login

DHS News

  • Release Date: 
    July 23, 2017

    For Immediate Release
    Office of the Press Secretary
    Contact: 202-282-8010

    WASHINGTON— This tragedy demonstrates the brutality of the network of which I often speak. These smugglers have no regard for human life and seek only profits. The Department of Homeland Security and its partners in the U.S., Mexico and Central America will continue to root out these smugglers, bring them to justice and dismantle their networks.

    The dedicated men and women of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement not only investigate and help prosecute horrific incidents like this but they and their U.S. Customs and Border Protection colleagues work hard day and night, 365 days a year, to prevent senseless deaths and injuries like these. They put their lives on the line to rescue and save the lives of those who attempt the treacherous journey north on the network of abuse and death.

    # # #

    Topics: 
    Keywords: 
  • Release Date: 
    July 21, 2017

    For Immediate Release
    Office of the Press Secretary
    Contact: 202-282-8010

    WASHINGTON—All 180 airlines and more than 280 last-point-of-departure airports around the world have implemented the first phase of enhanced security measures as outlined in Secretary Kelly’s June 28th remarks.

    The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has lifted the restrictions on large personal electronic devices for the ten airports/nine airlines in the Middle East and North Africa, which were announced in March. These airports and airlines have successfully implemented the first phase of enhanced security measures.

    There are currently no airlines under restrictions for large personal electronic devices. Airlines worldwide have implemented additional security measures that ultimately make the global aviation community more secure.

    The quick and decisive action taken by airlines, nations, and stakeholders is a testament to our shared commitment to raising the bar on global aviation security. Airlines were able to implement the necessary enhanced security measures because of the close coordination and extensive communication between aviation partners and the DHS/TSA.

    To learn more please see the fact sheet and Q&As.

    # # #


  • Release Date: 
    July 20, 2017

    For Immediate Release
    Office of the Press Secretary
    Contact: 202-282-8010

    WASHINGTON – Yesterday, Secretary of Homeland Security John F. Kelly discussed his top priorities for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) at the Aspen Security Forum. In a discussion with NBC News’ Pete Williams, Secretary Kelly highlighted DHS efforts to confront transnational criminal organizations by reducing drug demand, raise global aviation security standards, and bolster cybersecurity.

    Key excerpts from the conversation are below and you can watch the full conversation here.

     

    Secretary Kelly at Aspen Security Forum

     

    Secretary Kelly on stamping out transnational criminal organizations by reducing drug demand:

    “…the profits that come out of that drug market are fantastic and as a result the countries to our south, Mexico and further south, suffer terribly because of the violence and the trafficking, and the production…As Americans we should be ashamed of ourselves that we have done almost nothing to get our arms around drug demand…to try to influence the lives of folks who live in places like Central America, we work very very hard to inject investment, certainly U.S. help…”

    Secretary Kelly on raising global aviation security standards:

    “We can actually use this crisis as a way to raise global aviation security …In my view globally, at least of those final points of departure…we are raising aviation security as opposed to just going after one single threat.”

    Secretary Kelly on bolstering cybersecurity:

    “…The name of the game is coordination within our government at every level… and then fantastic partnerships with the commercial tech industry…”

    Secretary Kelly on the DHS reauthorization:

    “…I truly believe that it’s time to do this. One of the things I am hoping for is that we can really start looking at the efficiencies in the department…”

    Secretary Kelly on the DHS workforce:

    “ …For 45 years I benefited from serving under men and women who are the most amazing people in our society, the 1% as we say that serve in the U.S. military…when I came to this job I was really really pleasantly surprised at all of the patriotism, all of the dedication, all of the focus on protecting the nation is not just in the U.S. military…the men and women, particularly the law enforcement organizations…are incredibly dedicated people doing incredibly dangerous things and every one of them loves their job.”

     

    ###